dArt Magazine’s Foldout Insert and Playing Card Feature

by Steve Rockwell

Example foldout for coming Spring/Summer 2020 dArt, measuring 12.5 x 16 inches
Hypothetical example of foldout for coming Spring/Summer 2020 dArt, measuring 12.5 x 16 inches
Images from past dArt magazines trimmed to playing card size.
Images from past dArt magazines trimmed to playing card size.

Every copy of the coming Spring/Summer edition of dArt International magazine will be unique. The projected limited edition of 500 will feature a foldout insert that is a work of art in its own right – not a reproduction. We welcome proposals from artists to have their work displayed as an insert. In addition, dArt‘s new Playing Card feature will showcase the work of numerous artists, each rendered to the dimensions of a playing card and tipped into a hand-cut framed page.

A printed image of the work of Julian Schnabel cut to playing card dimensions by Steve Rockwell from an article on the artist that appeared in the Fall 2010 edition of dArt (#27).

Pick a Number Between 1 and 99

The Artwork that Led to the Publication of a Magazine

by Steve Rockwell

Steve Rockwell, Pick a Number between 1 and 99 (detail), 1987, ink on printed bond paper, 42.5 inches x 12 feet 10 inches
Steve Rockwell, Pick a Number between 1 and 99 (detail), 1987, ink on printed bond paper, 42.5 inches x 12 feet 10 inches

I had dropped out of the art scene already in 1972. When I came up with the idea for Pick a Number Between 1 and 99 in 1987, my contact with people I had known from art school and the early studio days had all but ceased. To quote Bob Dylan’s Like a Rolling Stone, professionally I was essentially “…a complete unknown.” Distanced from my past efforts, my future presented a blank slate. The situation was at once liberating, yet tinged by a sense of urgency.

Continue reading “Pick a Number Between 1 and 99”

Travel Light

by Christopher Hart Chambers

Mary Jones, Tinkering
Mary Jones, Tinkering, oil, spray enamel, aluminum leaf, and acetate X-Ray print on canvas, 14″ x 11″

My father had a brain tumor. His little sister, my aunt Peg, also had an acoustic neuroma. Her’s went malignant and she died. The fifth neurosurgeon screwed a specially built helmet onto Dad’s skull to blast his growth with radiation from 360 degrees. Continue reading “Travel Light”

The 1947 Progressive Artists Group: Painters for a Newly Free India

by Siba Kumar Das

M. F. Husain, Yatra, 1955
M. F. Husain, Yatra, 1955, oil on canvas, H. 33 1/2 x W. 42 1/2 in. (85.1 x 108 cm)
Collection Kiran Nadar Museum of Art, New Delhi

It’s not often that a new art movement shoots into life just as a nation needs it socio-politically. This is exactly what happened in 1947, the year India threw off the yoke of British imperial rule, when a group of young artists banded together in Mumbai (then Bombay) to launch the Progressive Artists’ Group with a view to creating, in the words of its manifesto, a “new art for a newly free India.”

Continue reading “The 1947 Progressive Artists Group: Painters for a Newly Free India”

Eozen Agopian at the Greek Consulate (New York)

by Jonathan Goodman

Eozen Agopian, Nicholas Space, 2018
Eozen Agopian, Nicholas Space, 2018, acrylic, thread and fabric on canvas,
100 X 90 cm (39.37 X 35.4”)

Of Armenian descent but born in Greece, where she now lives (with regular visits to New York), Eozen Agopian was educated in the United States – at Pratt Institute for her master’s degree and at Hunter College for her bachelor’s of fine arts. Her recent show, expertly curated by the art historian Thalia Vrachopoulos, The Fabric of Space, at the Greek consulate in New York City, enabled visitors to experience her highly worked art, dependent on cloth and thread, nearly as luminous as a Russian icon but also dedicated to the complex vectors and planes of modernist painting. Continue reading “Eozen Agopian at the Greek Consulate (New York)”

The Cove Pop-Up Exhibition

by D. Dominick Lombardi

Untitled, Raymond J.
Untitled, Raymond J., color pencil on paper

Once in a while I stumble upon an exhibition that really opens my eyes and reorients my thinking and understanding of the creative process. The Cove Pop Up exhibition here in Providence, RI, which includes paintings, drawings, sculptures, ceramics and utilitarian objects, offers a great number of art works by talented individuals who are dealing with varying degrees of debilitating issues. Continue reading “The Cove Pop-Up Exhibition”

The Rich Imagination of Jacques Roch: Sensuousness and Impertinent Play

by Dominique Nahas

Jacques Roch, The Kiss Of The Jellyfish, 1986
Jacques Roch, The Kiss Of The Jellyfish, 1986, acrylic on canvas, 54 x 66 inches

The current exhibition at Kim Foster Gallery in New York City allows us to experience the states-of-mind that pre-occupied, and occupied the late, remarkable artist Jacques Roch (1934-2015). In his notes Roch writes: “… I was born with the condition of the wide-awake dreamer…. The drawn line, clear on a colored ground, held the systems of shapes like a luminous net. The slapstick mood and lushness of color rendered less threatening my private bestiary of violent instincts, bawdy manners, diffuse fears, contagious glee, and even, sometimes, serenity…Continue reading “The Rich Imagination of Jacques Roch: Sensuousness and Impertinent Play”

Confluence at The Sylvia Wald and Po Kim Art Gallery in New York City

Keith Kattner, The Four Seasons, Winter, 2017
Keith Kattner, The Four Seasons, Winter, 2017, oil on canvas, 24″ x 30″s

by Robert Curcio

Confluence is an unassuming yet poignant and sincere exhibition featuring Keith Kattner with seven American and Korean artists that are working in parallel only to converge at this moment of exhibition. The exhibit joins together a variety of cultures, memories and traditions with innovation to address underlying personal, artistic and world view concerns. Continue reading “Confluence at The Sylvia Wald and Po Kim Art Gallery in New York City”

Three New Exhibitions at the Hammond Museum & Japanese Stroll Garden

by D. Dominick Lombardi

Sam Bartman, Majestic Waters (2001)
Sam Bartman, Majestic Waters (2001), mixed media on reflective plastic sheet, 17 x 17 inches

With three exhibitions opening at the Hammond Museum, the big surprise is the work of Sam Bartman. Born in Brooklyn, NY in 1922, Bartman has spent the last 60 years of his life creating stirring paintings that combine some of the most the incompatible materials. In experimenting with what he calls his “special sauce”, Bartman has somehow tamed a mix of resins, varnishes, motor oil, glitter and automotive paints with oils and acrylics that results in everything from endlessly crackling surfaces and minute swirling storms of color. There are even the occasional brushstrokes that push the variously drying materials around leaving fossil like impressions of battered brush hairs sorrowfully spent in a furious wake of swished paint. Continue reading “Three New Exhibitions at the Hammond Museum & Japanese Stroll Garden”