The Tao of Mary Hrbacek’s Trees

by Thalia Vrachopoulos

Mary Hrbacek, Hanging Suspended, 2008, acrylic on canvas, 40X44"
Mary Hrbacek, Hanging Suspended, 2008, acrylic on canvas, 40X44″

In her October exhibition at 107 West in New York City, Mary Hrbacek displays her series World Trees, 2015. Consisting of 24 acrylic on linen paintings, the series represents Hrbacek’s engagement and commitment to world sustainability. In a lyrical, evocative manner she accentuates the import of trees’ life-giving properties that allow humans to live and breathe. In this she recognizes that an individual working with the community can make for a real democracy. Hrbacek also realizes that there is a dark side to life and nature, as seen in her work Silver Dark Monarch, 2015 (acrylic on linen, 8×10″) that looks ominous when compared to some of her other tree paintings. Dark Monarch with its pink, black, green and silver tones recalls the withering effects of such an entity’s sovereignty. Hrbacek’s motifs are inspired by trees she came across in her travels to such places as Vermont, Italy, China, Morocco, the Czech Republic, Ireland, France and other places.

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Maelee Lee: Genesis

Verse 27: So God created mankind in his own image, in the image of God he created them; male and female he created them

by Dr. Thalia Vrachopoulos

Maelee Lee, Genesis, 2016, variable installation, multi channel video 2min. each
Maelee Lee, Genesis, 2016, variable installation, multi channel video 2min. each

Several years ago, for her new series of works, the artist Melee Lee began examining the issue of existence; being, becoming, having become – the world’s, other people’s, her own. This research led her to look at human development in general and more specifically into its issues. Consequently, this series of works involve history, humanity, while looking at diverse ethnic groups as well as the never-ending cycle of existence – life and death, as well as the establishment and demolition of nations.   

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Rachid Koraïchi : Le Chant de l’Ardent Désir

by Siba Kumar Das

Rachid Koraïchi, Jardin d'Afrique, 2021, woven tapestry, 129.92 x 90.94 in. Courtesy of Aicon Art
Rachid Koraïchi, Jardin d’Afrique, 2021, woven tapestry, 129.92 x 90.94 in. Courtesy of Aicon Art

Open till March 12, 2022, this is Aicon Art’s third solo show celebrating the art of Rachid Koraïchi—humanist, polymath, creator of art carrying universal significance. While originating in a culture permeated by Quranic scholarship and Sufi mysticism, his art crosses artistic frontiers going beyond Islamic calligraphy and inscription. In inventing a unique artistic language, Koraïchi draws upon many languages and cultures, including those of the Berber and Tuareg peoples. Within his fold, too, are invented Chinese ideograms plus magical squares and talismanic glyphs and other auspicious signs. Also most impressive is the range of his materials, the employment of which has often inspired the artist to create a symbiotic partnership with designers and artisans around the globe. 

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Nathaniel Mary Quinn and Not Far From Home: Still Far Away

by Mary Hrbacek

Nathaniel Mary Quinn, All the Lost Awards, All That Was Lost, 2021, oil paint, pain stick, oil pastel, soft pastel, gouache, black charcoal on linen canvas stretched over wood panel, 30 x 30 inches, 76.2 x 76.2 cm © Nathaniel Mary Quinn. Photo: Rob McKeever, courtesy Gagosian
Nathaniel Mary Quinn, All the Lost Awards, All That Was Lost, 2021, oil paint, pain stick, oil pastel, soft pastel, gouache, black charcoal on linen canvas stretched over wood panel, 30 x 30 inches, 76.2 x 76.2 cm © Nathaniel Mary Quinn. Photo: Rob McKeever, courtesy Gagosian

Nathaniel Mary Quinn, “Not Far From Home; Still Far Away,” at Gagosian, presented an exploration of Quinn’s relationships in fourteen intense portraits, created in a range of media that includes oil paint, gouache, charcoal, oil stick and pastel.  Distortion is the keynote of Quinn’s inner-based perception, expressed in a vision that transforms the artist, his friends and his female subject, apparently his mother.  He disregards visually perceivable features, boldly executing truncated, layered, re-imagined, and spliced images that exude a sense of deep emotional anguish.  Quinn’s impeccable inventive paintings compare with the visceral images Francis Bacon created in his portraits, and Picasso’s Synthetic Cubist women.  

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Forest Bathing – A Group Exhibition about Nature

by Jen Dragon

Forest Bathing installation view John Lyon Paul (left) Anne Leith (right)
Forest Bathing installation view John Lyon Paul (left) Anne Leith (right)

Woodstock, NY – Forest Bathing is a concept that originated in Japan in the 1980’s as an antidote to an increasingly technological and alienating world. The idea is to mindfully walk in the woodlands and reconnect with the sounds, smells, colors and textures of nature. The recent Covid pandemic and its restrictions on indoor gatherings have forced a return to the outdoors creating a renewed appreciation for the forest habitat and its seasonal cycles. Inspired by the woodlands of upstate New York, this exhibition features artwork by Ashley Garrett, Anne Leith, Iain Machell, John Lyon Paul, Christy Rupp and Martin Weinstein. 

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