Church and Rothko: Sublime

by Mary Hrbacek

Frederic Edwin Churh, "After the Rainstorm," oil on canvas mounted on panel, 22 1/2 x 33 1/2, 1875
Frederic Edwin Churh, “After the Rainstorm,” oil on canvas mounted on panel, 22 1/2 x 33 1/2, 1875. Courtesy of Mnuchin Gallery, New York.

 “Church and Rothko: Sublime,” an exhibition of twenty-seven oil paintings on canvas, brings into focus, in the context of the ‘Sublime,’ the similarities and divergences of two deeply contrasting artists who extended the art of painting to suit their overriding visions, separated by a span of nearly 100 years. 

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Senses Return – Miami Style

by Rupert Ravens

Detail of Hebime acrylic on wood panel work.

Covid-19 has smacked down our opportunity to congregate.  A resulting casualty was Miami’s 2020 art bacchanal.

Fair and venue cancellations have rapidly spawned OVR (online viewing rooms).  Ouch.  Tech’s solution is gimmickry compared to centuries of human UX (user experience) with nature.  Can any screen deliver the ultra-high infinite resolution of in-person reality?

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Still Sizzling… Top Ten Artists from the last live Art Basel Fair week

by Gae Savannah

Detail of Gabe Brown, Flow,  2019, oil on linen over wood panel

I’m dreaming of Miami. Art is a living presence, an intelligence outside of that which we already possess.  Among the blows of this pandemic year, the loss of experiencing art in real space is a deep darkness.  In the ecstatic buzz of a live fair, one answers the call of one booth, one artist, one artwork at a time.  Dumbstruck, you feel the materiality open up in heart and mind, change, and grow. 

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Jaroslava Prihodova’s Measured Confluence

Interview of the Artist by D. Dominick Lombardi

Detail of Jaroslava Prihodova, Table Light (2015), pine, glass, plastic work

Raised in Velký Šenov, in the Bohemia section of the Czech Republic, and currently living in Cortland, New York, Jaroslava Prihodova’s life has truly been a tale of two cities. Growing up in a Communist state, with her parents, an aunt and uncle and her grandparents, Prihodova has largely happy memories of those early days. The bucolic setting of her childhood home, that was situated next to a fruit orchard and a vegetable garden, and where chickens and rabbits were raised, the young Prihodova saw life as wholly sustainable and quite secure. On the other hand, there was always that overriding system of order and intolerance for the West imposed by the totalitarian regime that brought change and inspiration to her thinking later in life.

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