Where to Draw the Line at OneWay Gallery

by D. Dominick Lombardi

Stephen Cook, My Disease My Infection (2017)
Stephen Cook, My Disease My Infection (2017), charcoal, oil stick and aluminum paint on paper, 77 ¾ x 61 ½ inches

It was one year ago that I first became acquainted with the work of Stephen Cook and OneWay Gallery. Being in Narragansett, I was not expecting to see much beyond the stereotypical sails and sunsets in any ‘art gallery’, so I was completely taken aback by Cook’s versatility and vigor as a contemporary painter.
Continue reading “Where to Draw the Line at OneWay Gallery”

The Tale of Auguste’s Brain

Pierre-Auguste Renoir, After the Bath (1888)
Pierre-Auguste Renoir, After the Bath (1888), oil on canvas, 25 ½ x 21 ¼ inches, Wikipedia images
by D. Dominick Lombardi

It was probably somewhere around 1987 when I read a quote attributed to Auguste Renoir in an art magazine. I don’t recall the exact passage, but he likened his paintbrush to his penis when discussing why he so obsessed over capturing the erotic aspects of a woman’s flesh. A month or so later I made a drawing, I was in my pseudo Post Modern stage making sculptures that looked like they could have been executed in the nineteen teens, twenties or thirties, and the subject was my interpretation of Renoir’s sensual sentiment about his female nudes. Continue reading “The Tale of Auguste’s Brain”

Magnetic Field @ MFA (Museum of Fine Arts)

Magnetic Fields: Expanding American Abstraction, 1960s to Today
Magnetic Fields: Expanding American Abstraction, 1960s to Today, Installation View, Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg, Florida, Photo: Courtesy of the author

Magnetic Fields: Expanding American Abstraction, 1960s to Today: Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg, Florida

by D. Dominick Lombardi

Magnetic Fields: Expanding American Abstraction, 1960s to Today, which celebrates “the contributions of black women in the field of abstract art”, is a wonderful and stunning exhibition that features many powerful examples of Abstract Art. Walking through the exhibition, I am immediately struck by both the diversity and depth of the selections and the overall scale of the exhibition. Continue reading “Magnetic Field @ MFA (Museum of Fine Arts)”

Water Over the Bridge: Contemporary Seascapes

Holly Sears, Swimmers (2011), oil on paper
Holly Sears, Swimmers (2011), oil on paper, laminated on board, 20 x 26 inches, Photo: Courtesy of the artist.

by Julie Garisto

Considering the scope of climate change, it really begs the question why more artists aren’t tackling the subject.

Fortunately, we’re seeing a sea change. Artists from the Sunshine State (and others) are assuming the mantle for bringing attention to a subject that is as dire as it is censored – heck, the words “climate change” are even forbidden from being included in official documents, a mandate from Gov. Rick Scott. Continue reading “Water Over the Bridge: Contemporary Seascapes”

Industry City Meets M. C. Escher

M. C. Escher, Relativity, Lithograph
M. C. Escher, Relativity, Lithograph, Private Collection, Usa, All M. C. Escher Works @ 2018 The M. C. Escher Company. All rights reserved www.mcescher.com
by D. Dominick Lombardi

M. C. Escher (1898-1972) has been a favorite of mine since the 1960s when that decade’s psychedelic, counter-culture mindset saw common ground in his transformative work. Escher’s art made it possible for all of us to see the impossible, to experience dimensions of space and time that were previously unimaginable. He combined math, architecture and science with a unique aesthetic in viewing the world around him, as it all coalesced in his brilliant mind resulting in the creation of a good number of incredibly iconic images. Continue reading “Industry City Meets M. C. Escher”

Phonic Rhythms

Sean Sullivan at Jack Hanley Gallery in New York City

by Gae Savannah
Jack Hanley Gallery, Sean Sullivan
Sean Sullivan, á ùne éa: No. 1-15, 2018, oil on found paper, dimensions variable

A medley of riffs, measured out and then not. In “á ùne éa, #1-15,” musical bar lines form initial structures. Wayward marks though, soon follow. Through Sean Sullivan’s guileless delight in clumsy shapes and patterns, a language of flaw emerges. Included are two printmaking matrices, post oil-transfer process. Continue reading “Phonic Rhythms”

Where Art and History Will Bring You Back

The historic Monthaven Arts and Cultural Center, or Leonard B. Fite House in Hendersonville, Tennessee. Photo courtesy Monthaven Arts and Cultural Center

Autumn de Forest at the Monthaven Arts and Cultural Centre in Hendersonville, Tennessee

by Steve Rockwell

On a sunny August day it’s a beautiful drive for some 18 Tennessee miles into the country from Nashville to get to Monthaven, a historic home in Hendersonville. Chances are that you’ll step on Johnny Cash Parkway at some point, the city’s main road. To the best of my knowledge, more recent residents of note, the likes of Kelly Clarkson and Taylor Swift don’t have parkways named after them as yet. Continue reading “Where Art and History Will Bring You Back”

dArtles

by Steve Rockwell

dArt logo with an image by an anonymous photographer of Joan Mitchell and Jean Paul Riopelle in Chicago, about 1957. Yseult Riopelle Archives. Private collection © Estate of Jean Paul Riopelle / SODRAC (2017)

It has been nearly 15 years since dArt magazine has stuck its digital fingers into the design and look of its online presence. It’s hardly late-breaking news that the torrent of information flowing through our devices is ever-massing. Its invasive waves lap freely into our private and public spaces. Continue reading “dArtles”

Mitchell/Riopelle: Nothing in Moderation

Musée national des beaux-art du Québec, Québec City, Québec, October 12, 2018 – January 7, 2018 Art Gallery Ontario, Toronto, Ontario, February 18 – May 6, 2018

by Emese Krunák-Hajagos

On my way to this exhibition I was thinking of Joan Mitchell and Jean-Paul Riopelle as a Golden Couple of a Golden Age. The Golden Age is true. Paris still had its charm and New York was rising into its future glory. Riopelle was a golden boy, irresistible and charming with his expensive race cars – including Bugattis – boats, properties and artistic success. Mitchell was a very confident person, athletic and not shy about her body at all. Looking at photographs with her lovers we can’t miss seeing the sexual magnetism radiating from her. It was a good match in many ways, but they were everything but a golden couple. Continue reading “Mitchell/Riopelle: Nothing in Moderation”